Three things we would not miss if we moved to another First World country

I refer to the 29 Jul 2013 Straits Times letter “Three things to cherish in S’pore” by Mr Maa Zhi Hong [1].

Mr Maa reminded fellow Singaporeans to cherish the three things we would miss most if we lived in another country – clean drinking water, low crime rate and clean streets. The following table shows 26 other advanced economies that score better than Singapore for the average of percentage of population with access to improved water source, non-homicide rate and environment performance indicator [2].

Countries Average % population with access to improved water source 1990-2010 Average Environment Performance Indicator 2000-2012 (normalised upon 100) Average non-homicide rate 1995-2011 (per 100,000) Average of the three indicators
Switzerland 100.0 100.0 100 100.0
Norway 100.0 90.2 100 96.7
Luxembourg 100.0 89.1 100 96.4
Austria 100.0 88.6 100 96.2
Italy 100.0 88.2 100 96.1
Sweden 100.0 87.5 100 95.8
France 100.0 86.9 100 95.6
Germany 100.0 86.4 100 95.5
United Kingdom 100.0 86.3 100 95.4
Iceland 100.0 84.3 100 94.8
Netherlands 100.0 84.1 100 94.7
Slovakia 100.0 83.0 100 94.3
New Zealand 100.0 82.5 100 94.2
Finland 100.0 81.6 100 93.9
Czech Republic 100.0 81.5 100 93.8
Japan 100.0 80.9 100 93.6
Denmark 100.0 80.8 100 93.6
Belgium 100.0 79.5 100 93.2
Slovenia 99.8 78.4 100 92.7
Spain 100.0 75.4 100 91.8
Greece 98.8 75.8 100 91.5
Canada 100.0 74.0 100 91.3
Ireland 100.0 73.9 100 91.3
Cyprus 100.0 73.8 100 91.3
Australia 100.0 73.5 100 91.2
United States 99.0 73.4 100 90.8
Singapore 99.9 71.8 100 90.6
Estonia 98.0 72.8 100 90.3
Israel 100.0 70.8 100 90.3
Portugal 98.0 70.8 100 89.6
South Korea 93.7 71.8 100 88.5
Malta 100.0 61.9 100 87.3

We should thus not miss these First World creature comforts too much if we moved to any other First World nation. We should also remember that our journey towards the First World began during the colonial days. For example, our clean water system began with Tan Kim Seng’s $13,000 donation in 1857 to build our first waterworks and piped water supply [3].

[1] Straits Times, Three things to cherish in S’pore, 29 Jul 2013

[2]
Percentage of population with access to improved water source:
• Data from World Bank data which is in turned from World Health Organization and United Nations Children’s Fund, Joint Measurement Programme
• Averaged from 1990 to 2010 (latest available)

Non-homicide rate
• Non-homicide rate calculated by taking 1 – homicide rate / 100,000.
• Homicide rate is from United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
• For example, Switzerland has a homicide rate of 0.95 cases per 100,000 population. This means that the corresponding non-homicide rate is 99,999.05 per 100,0000 population or close to 100%
• Averaged from 1995 to 2011 (latest available)

Environment Performance Indicator
• Used as proxy for road cleanliness
• Data from Yale university and Columbia university averaged from 2000 to 2012 and normalised against the highest scorer, Switzerland

[3] http://www.pub.gov.sg/about/historyfuture/Pages/WaterSupply.aspx

It was only in 1857 that philanthropist Tan Kim Seng made a donation of S$13,000 for the building of Singapore’s first waterworks and piped water supply.

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One Response to “Three things we would not miss if we moved to another First World country”

  1. ;Annonymous Says:

    Kudos to you for always taking pains to deconstruct these fawning minions. The recent barrage to glorify themselves is a sign of their weakness and legitimacy in the eyes of the citizens in the face of the imminent demise of LKY. Just like North Korea today – the glorification of the so-called exploits of the father and grandfather of Kim Jong Un.

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